Miscellany

This Collection gathers contributions to The 18th-Century Common that do not (yet) fit into the other topical Collections.

Click Get Involved if you would like to contribute work that does not fall into another Collection but would be of interest to the readers of The 18th-Century Common.

The Great Forgetting: Women Writers Before Austen

<em>The Great Forgetting: Women Writers Before Austen</em>

The Great Forgetting: Women Writers Before Austen is a free podcast series addressing the lives and works of eighteenth-century women writers, devised and produced by one journalist and three academics. One day while chatting on Twitter, Helen Lewis (deputy editor of the New Statesman, a leading British weekly magazine focusing on politics and culture) Jennie Batchelor (University of Kent), Sophie Coulombeau (Cardiff University), and Elizabeth Edwards (University of Wales) discovered that they shared not only a love of eighteenth-century women’s writing, but also a conviction that the world needed to know more about it. An idea was born: a six-part podcast series, aimed at the non-specialist listener, about the lives, works and legacies of the women who changed the face of literature – but had, from the beginning of the nineteenth century, been gradually subjected to what Clifford Siskin calls ‘The Great Forgetting’.

The Marquis d’Argens: A Philosophical Life

<em>The Marquis d’Argens: A Philosophical Life</em>

The Marquis d’Argens (1704-1772) is mainly famous for a book he did not write, Thérèse Philosophe. That is a great pity, as the books he did actually write are far more fascinating and entertaining than that unfortunate misattribution. D’Argens was a sceptic, a thorn in the side of the Catholic Church, whose books were denounced by the Inquisition; one of them, La Philosophie du Bon-Sens, was burnt in Paris. He was also a close friend of Voltaire, and belonged to the generation that is often overshadowed by that towering genius.

Haiti’s First Novel: Expanding the Study of the Age of Revolutions

Haiti’s First Novel: Expanding the Study of the Age of Revolutions

Out of print for over a century, Stella, Haiti’s first novel, has often been overlooked. This neglect is partly due to a nineteenth-century colonial mentality that denigrated Haiti and Haitians, constantly judging them against standards established for the purpose of exclusion.

Sex and the Founding Fathers

Sex and the Founding Fathers

By tracing how intimacy has figured in popular memory of the Founders from their own lifetimes to the recent past, Sex and the Founding Fathers shows that sex has long been used to define their masculine character and political authority and has always figured in civic and national identity.

The Tercentenary of the Birth of Laurence Sterne: a Man for Our Times

The Tercentenary of the Birth of Laurence Sterne: a Man for Our Times

So is Sterne a man for our times? I believe that he is, and that his voice, speaking of a humanity dominated by benevolence, is urgently needed to remind the religious of this basic component of their religion; to direct people towards their common humanity; and, in the course of this to help us to determine what, in fact, it means to be human.

Poetry with a Different Purpose: Resurrecting Britain’s Bard

Poetry with a Different Purpose: Resurrecting Britain’s Bard

In September 1792, on the day of the autumnal equinox, a Welshman named Iolo Morganwg met friends on Primrose Hill near what is now Regent’s Park in London. There, they made a circle out of stones. The largest stone was fashioned into an altar. On this altar was placed an unsheathed sword. Standing on these stones and dressed in wildly colored robes, the company recited Welsh history and poetry.

Collaborative Reading of Simon Gikandi’s Slavery and The Culture of Taste

Collaborative Reading of Simon Gikandi’s Slavery and The Culture of Taste

The Long 18th, a scholarly blog devoted to 18th-century literature, history, and culture, is conducting a week-long collaborative reading of Simon Gikandi’s award-winning Slavery and the Culture of Taste (Princeton UP, 2011), from May 13-20, 2013. We have been reading […]

Who Is a Terrorist? “Terrorism” in the Long 18th Century

Who Is a Terrorist? “Terrorism” in the Long 18th Century

“Terrorist” first entered the English language in Edmund Burke’s Letters on a Regicide Peace, written and published throughout 1795 and 1796 –the politician and philosopher’s extended argument against England ending its war with France, and his last reaction to the French Revolution. It came directly from the French “terroriste” and “terrorisme,” both of which came into use in 1794, during the most violent phase of the Revolution.

Pride & Prejudice at 200

Pride & Prejudice at 200

Megan Mulder contextualizes Wake Forest University’s first edition of Pride and Prejudice and Devoney Looser reviews two new books that examine Austen’s enduring appeal.

An 18th-Century Argument Against the Death Penalty

An 18th-Century Argument Against the Death Penalty

Cesare Beccaria (1738-1794), Enlightenment philosopher and Italian jurist, is back in the news. Lawyers for convicted murderer Jody Lee Miles in Maryland have used his argument against the death penalty.

Daniel Defoe Around the Web

Daniel Defoe Around the Web

Here are some recent internet gleanings for enthusiasts of Daniel Defoe to explore: Stephen H. Gregg posts monthly on his Daniel Defoe Blog; most recently he wrote about what readers should call the character commonly known as “Roxana.” This Eighteenth-Century […]

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Jane Austen!

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Jane Austen!

Recent posts around the web marking Jane Austen’s birthday.

Dogs of the 18th Century

Dogs of the 18th Century

The invention of dogs as pets in the eighteenth century.

Eric G. Wilson on Keats & Weirdness

Eric G. Wilson on Keats & Weirdness

Friends and followers of The 18th-Century Common will likely want to read Professor Eric G. Wilson’s recent essay, entitled “Poetry Makes You Weird,” published earlier this week on the website of The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Wilson’s piece reminds us […]

The Afterlife of Mary Shelley (in New York City)

The Afterlife of Mary Shelley (in New York City)

The literary and cultural reputation of the Shelleys is alive and well in New York City.

The University of Woodford Square and the Age of Obama

The University of Woodford Square and the Age of Obama

The non-Western world was the “common” of 18th-century Europe, territory to be gradually colonized—fenced off, walled off, or hedged off—by powers looking to raise the value (and the rents) of their respective empires.

“African” in Early Haiti, or How to Fight Stereotypes

“African” in Early Haiti, or How to Fight Stereotypes

The concept of Africa as a unified region whose inhabitants share a common identity developed alongside the transatlantic slave trade of the eighteenth century.

Guns and Austen

Guns and Austen

Guns in C18 Fiction, Jane Austen and presidential narratives, Austen in Montreal…

Taxes are Evil

Taxes are Evil

In the wake of last summer’s debt-ceiling crisis, Republicans blamed America’s slow economic recovery on big government – or rather, the threat of big government. They claimed that a “climate of uncertainty” – a fear of future regulations and taxation – was keeping “job […]

Fear and Love in a Revolutionary War

Fear and Love in a Revolutionary War

The memory began like a fairytale or Greek myth.  A young soldier walked along a forest road in the Highlands in the summer of 1780, the fifth year of the war.  Turning a corner, about forty yards off, he saw a young […]