Gazette

The Gazette section of The 18th-Century Common puts recent publications—whether in academic or popular media—in scholarly context.  Gazette posts show how a recent publication participates in the conversations of eighteenth-century scholarship. For example, Cassandra Nelson’s piece “‘The Mechanical Turk’ and Automata of the 18th Century” connects readers of Adam Gopnik’s essay on the “Mechanical Turk” for the BBC to a wide range of scholarship on the eighteenth-century automata. You can browse both Features and Gazette pieces by topic within Collections.

Readers can nominate content from around the Internet for Gazette pieces by posting links on Twitter with the hashtag #18common. Additionally, we seek scholars, graduate students, and even advanced undergraduates to serve as short-term Gazette Contributors. Click Get Involved for more information.

Jane Austen Summer Program Presents: 
“200 Years of Persuasion

Jane Austen Summer Program Presents: 
“200 Years of <em/>Persuasion</em>”

UNC-CH & JASNA-NC will host the fifth-annual Jane Austen Summer Program from June 15-18, ’17 to explore this year’s chosen theme: “200 Years of Persuasion.”

Interiority and Jane Porter’s Pocket Diary

Interiority and Jane Porter’s Pocket Diary

Julie Park, Assistant Professor of English at Vassar College, describes her fascinating recent research into the “written documents of daily life from real eighteenth-century lives” at the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Collaborative Reading of Simon Gikandi’s Slavery and The Culture of Taste

Collaborative Reading of Simon Gikandi’s Slavery and The Culture of Taste

The Long 18th, a scholarly blog devoted to 18th-century literature, history, and culture, is conducting a week-long collaborative reading of Simon Gikandi’s award-winning Slavery and the Culture of Taste (Princeton UP, 2011), from May 13-20, 2013. We have been reading […]

English Pleasure Gardens

English Pleasure Gardens

In many ways, pleasure gardens were the amusement parks of Georgian England, allowing visitors to escape the hustle and bustle of city life while offering them a variety of entertainment, including picturesque gardens, strolling paths, musical concerts, al fresco dining, balloon rides, waterfalls, fountain displays, masquerades, balls, and even fireworks shows.

“The Mechanical Turk” and Automata of the 18th Century

“The Mechanical Turk” and Automata of the 18th Century

In a recent article for the BBC News, Adam Gopnik reflects on the persistent allure of the Turk, a chess-playing automaton that fascinated 18th century spectators across Europe and America.

Pride & Prejudice at 200

Pride & Prejudice at 200

Megan Mulder contextualizes Wake Forest University’s first edition of Pride and Prejudice and Devoney Looser reviews two new books that examine Austen’s enduring appeal.

HASTAC Reviews The 18th-Century Common

HASTAC Reviews The 18th-Century Common

Kirstyn Leuner reviews 18thcenturycommon.org for HASTAC.

Daniel Defoe Around the Web

Daniel Defoe Around the Web

Here are some recent internet gleanings for enthusiasts of Daniel Defoe to explore: Stephen H. Gregg posts monthly on his Daniel Defoe Blog; most recently he wrote about what readers should call the character commonly known as “Roxana.” This Eighteenth-Century […]

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Jane Austen!

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Jane Austen!

Recent posts around the web marking Jane Austen’s birthday.

Dogs of the 18th Century

Dogs of the 18th Century

The invention of dogs as pets in the eighteenth century.

Eric G. Wilson on Keats & Weirdness

Eric G. Wilson on Keats & Weirdness

Friends and followers of The 18th-Century Common will likely want to read Professor Eric G. Wilson’s recent essay, entitled “Poetry Makes You Weird,” published earlier this week on the website of The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Wilson’s piece reminds us […]

18th-Century Balloonomania!

18th-Century Balloonomania!

Balloonomania gripped France and England in the 1780s as numerous inventors ascended in hot-air balloons in the first human flights.

Cognitive Science and the Humanities in 18th-Century Studies

Cognitive Science and the Humanities in 18th-Century Studies

“This is your brain on Jane Austen…” What role should developments in cognitive science play in humanities research?

The Afterlife of Mary Shelley (in New York City)

The Afterlife of Mary Shelley (in New York City)

The literary and cultural reputation of the Shelleys is alive and well in New York City.

18th-Century Feminism, Women’s Poetry, and an 18th-Century Library

18th-Century Feminism, Women’s Poetry, and an 18th-Century Library

Feminism in 18th-century culture; an online journal devoted to women in the arts in the long-18th century; and a newly-cataloged collection of rare 18th-century books in an 18th-century library in New York City.

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Sir William Herschel!

Happy (Recent) Birthday, Sir William Herschel!

The music and astronomical work of Sir William Herschel, around the web.

Guns and Austen

Guns and Austen

Guns in C18 Fiction, Jane Austen and presidential narratives, Austen in Montreal…