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Jane Austen Summer Program Presents: “Mansfield Park & Its Afterlives”

Jane Austen Summer Program Presents: “<em>Mansfield Park</em> & Its Afterlives”

This summer, more than 100 people, including Austen fans, established scholars, graduate students, K-12 teachers, and aspiring authors, will have the opportunity to hear expert speakers and participate in discussion groups on Austen’s most controversial novel, Mansfield Park.

Haiti’s First Novel: Expanding the Study of the Age of Revolutions

Haiti’s First Novel: Expanding the Study of the Age of Revolutions

Out of print for over a century, Stella, Haiti’s first novel, has often been overlooked. This neglect is partly due to a nineteenth-century colonial mentality that denigrated Haiti and Haitians, constantly judging them against standards established for the purpose of exclusion.

Appropriating the Restoration: Fictional Place and Time in Rose Tremain’s Restoration: A Novel of Seventeenth-Century England

Appropriating the Restoration: Fictional Place and Time in Rose Tremain’s <em>Restoration: A Novel of Seventeenth-Century England</em>

It was the sixties—albeit the 1660s—a time for tricksters, rakes, subversive women and sexual energy on the stage. It was a time of fun for those with the means to partake of it. The “good old days” are, of course, always better from a distance, but writers on through the twentieth century found the Restoration an apt setting for their fictions about prostitution, political intrigue, and tragic or comic historical events, especially for the cinema.

Exhibition Announcement: “SWEET 18” Contemporary Art, Fashion, and Design Inspired by the 18th Century

Exhibition Announcement: “SWEET 18” Contemporary Art, Fashion, and Design Inspired by the 18th Century

Through 5 July 2015, Hingene Castle (Belgium) will act as the setting for SWEET 18, a unique exhibition that explores the 18th century through the eyes of fifty contemporary artists and fashion designers.

What the Abyssinian Liar Can Tell us about True Stories: Knowledge, Skepticism, and James Bruce’s Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile

What the Abyssinian Liar Can Tell us about True Stories: Knowledge, Skepticism, and James Bruce’s <em>Travels to Discover the Source of the Nile</em>

In 1773, James Bruce of Kinnaird returned to Europe after a decade of travel and study in North East Africa and Abyssinia (present-day Ethiopia). Initially, the knowledge he brought back with him was favorably received by notable figures like the great naturalist the Comte de Buffon, Pope Clement XIV, King Louis XV, and Dr. Charles Burney, ethnomusicologist, composer, and father of author Frances Burney. But as time went on, the public began to grow suspicious of some of his stories, such as his claims that he had eaten lion meat with a tribe in North Africa or that Abyssinian soldiers cut steaks from the rumps of live cows, then stitched the cows up again and sent them out to pasture.